Dusit Hall, Grand Palace, Phra Borom Maha Ratchawang, Phra Nakhon, Bangkok, Thailand
(Phra Thinang Dusit Maha Prasat)
พระบรมมหาราช พระที่นั่งดุสิตมหาปราสาท พระบรมมหาราชวัง พระนคร กรุงเทพฯ ประเทศไทย

Home   Galleries   Order Info   Resources   Show Schedule   About Me   Newest Items   Site Map   Table of Contents   Search

<^>>^>
Click here to see photos specific to this set of Temples or click below for latest photos available.

Dusit Hall (DTHB0150)
พระบรมมหาราช พระที่นั่งดุสิตมหาปราสาท

Dusit Hall (DTHB0177)
พระที่นั่งดุสิตมหาปราสาท และ พระที่นั่งอาภรณ์ภิโมกข์ปราสาท

Dusit Hall Garuda (DTHB0155)
พระบรมมหาราช พระที่นั่งดุสิตมหาปราสาทครุฑมีปีก

Aphorn Phimok Prasat Pavilion (DTHB0151)
พระบรมมหาราช พระที่นั่งอาภรณ์ภิโมกข์ปราสาท

26TS Aphorn Phimok Prasat Pavilion
พระบรมมหาราช พระที่นั่งอาภรณ์ภิโมกข์ปราสาท
 

Aphorn Phimok Prasat Pavilion (DTHB0178)
พระบรมมหาราช พระที่นั่งอาภรณ์ภิโมกข์ปราสาท

Dusit Hall Compound Gate (DTHB0152)
พระบรมมหาราช พระที่นั่งดุสิตมหาปราสาทประตูสารประกอบของ

Dusit Hall Compound Gate (DTHB0153)
พระบรมมหาราช พระที่นั่งดุสิตมหาปราสาทประตูสารประกอบของ

Dusit Hall Compound Gate (DTHB0154)
พระบรมมหาราช พระที่นั่งดุสิตมหาปราสาทประตูสารประกอบของ

Chakri Maha Prasat (DTHB0222)
พระบรมมหาราช พระที่นั่งจักรีมหาปราสาท
 
 
พระที่นั่งดุสิตมหาปราสาท

Chakri Maha Prasat (DTHB0176)
พระบรมมหาราช พระที่นั่งจักรีมหาปราสาท

พระที่นั่งดุสิตมหาปราสาท
 
 
Dusit Hall was constructed by King Rama I in 1789 on the site of an audience hall which was struck by lightning and burnt down during the early years of his reign.
The throne hall is built in the shape of a cross. Its four wings are covered with four-tiered roofs from the center of which rises a beautiful nine-tiered prasat spire, the base of which is supported by four Garudas clasping Nagas. Its north wing leads to a window-throne for formal outdoor receptions which is now seldom used, the last occasion being when King Rama VI received the oath of fealty from the court after his coronation in 1911. Inside the hall are a throne inlaid with mother-of-pearl, surmounted by a nine-tiered white canopy and a bed inlaid also with mother-of-pearl, today used as an altar. In the south wing is a window in the form of a throne built by King Mongkut (King Rama IV) rather resembling King Narai's throne in the Palace at Lopburi. The interior walls are painted with delicate designs. The hall communicates with an apartment called "Phiman Rataya", situated in a garden. Dusit Hall is noted for its pure style and dignified simplicity. This hall was used for coronations, formal audiences and for the revision of the Buddhist scriptures. Since the death of King Rama I, it has been the place for lying-in-state. It is also used for certain royal unctions like merit making. One of the special ceremonies that takes place here annually is the commemoration of coronation day. King Rama III used to give audience here to the Court while he resided at Phra Maha Prasat during the renovation of his regular residence.


Wikimapia location<
 
Scenic Photography by Gerry Gantt from Thailand, the land of Golden Wats.
All images Copyright © 1999 - by Gerry Gantt, all rights reserved.